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Social Journalism Study

The fifth annual Social Journalism Study, conducted by Cision and Canterbury Christ Church University, tracks the ways social media affects journalists and media professionals in both their work and in their communication with PR professionals with data gathered from the United States, Canada, Finland, Germany, France, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

First Results: U.S. Journalists and Social Media Key Findings

1. U.S. journalists still fit into five distinct groups with Promoters representing the majority

2. Journalists believe social media is most important for publishing and promoting content and interacting with audiences

3. Facebook and Twitter are the top platforms, but most journalists use a variety of social media

4. About half of U.S. journalists feel they could not carry out their work without social media

5. Most journalists feel they are more engaged with their audiences because of social media

6. A majority of journalists have a good relationship with their PR contacts, though less than half consider them to be reliable sources

7. Email continues to be the preferred form of contact between journalists and PR professionals, but social media follows closely behind

International Journalists and Social Media Key Findings

1. Germany and Canada report the highest daily use of social media for work, while France reports the lowest

2. Social media is valued most for publishing and promoting content in almost all surveyed countries

3. Most respondents use at least three social media platforms for work

4. Canadian and U.S. journalists are the most confident users of social media, while Finnish and Swedish are the least

5. The majority of respondents believe social media has fundamentally changed their role as journalists

6. Most journalists feel they have a good relationship with their PR contacts, although journalists in Germany and the U.K. are most likely to use them as a main source of Information

About the Survey

Cision and Canterbury Christ Church University conducted an online survey about the uses, behaviors, attitudes and perceptions of social media amongst journalists. Respondents were found using Cision’s and Gorkana’s media database of more than 1.5 million influencers globally.

Further interesting results of the Study: Read more.

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Kommentare

Cision’s free 2016 Global Social Journalism Study, directed in association with Canterbury Christ Church University, studied writers from seven distinct nations on their web-based social networking propensities, inclinations and perspectives.

Key discoveries include:

Email is columnists’ favored type of correspondence with PR experts

Half of columnists couldn’t do their work without online networking

68 percent of writers use no less than three sorts of web-based social networking.
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